Our Scientists

Our research comes from leading scientists around the world.

Dr. Shoaib Afzal, one of the world’s leading epidemiologists on sun exposure and obesity, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and all-cause mortality. University of Copenhagen School of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark. 

Dr. Lars Alfredsson, one of the world's leading epidemiologists on the environmental risk factors for multiple sclerosis. Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.

Dr. Bruce K. Armstrong, the world’s leading epidemiologist on solar radiation and skin cancer. University of Sydney Medical School, Sydney, Australia. 

Dr. Alberto Ascherio, the world’s leading epidemiologist on sun exposure and multiple sclerosis. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Allan Butterfield, biochemist and one of the world’s leading experts on Alzheimer’s disease. University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky.

Dr. Rajiv Chowdhury, author of one of the two leading studies on sun exposure and all-cause mortality, finding that 12.8% of all deaths in the United States are attributable to insufficient sun exposure. University of Cambridge Medical School, Cambridge, England. 

 

Dr. Martin Feelisch, together with Dr. Richard Weller, a pioneer in discovering how nitric oxide is produced in the body by sun exposure and the favorable health effects of nitric oxide. University of Southampton School of Medicine, Southampton, England. 

Dr. Cedric Garland, together with his late brother, Dr. Frank Garland, a pioneer in discovering that cancer incidence was greater at higher latitudes with weaker sun exposure than at lower latitudes with stronger sun exposure. The world’s leading epidemiologist on sun exposure and breast and colon cancer, and one of the world’s leading epidemiologists on sun exposure and type 1 diabetes. University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California. 

Dr. Oliver Gillie, British journalist, author, scientist and pioneer in bringing to public view the dangers of insufficient sun exposure. Deceased. Independent scientist and journalist.

Dr. Frank de Gruijl, biophysicist and the world’s leading expert at the cellular level on solar radiation and skin cancer. The first scientist in the world to discover why sunburn increases the risk of melanoma but non-burning sun exposure reduces the risk of melanoma. Leyden University Medical School, Leyden, The Netherlands. 

Dr. Prue Hart, one of the world’s leading epidemiologists on sun exposure and asthma, metabolic syndrome and multiple sclerosis.  Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. 

Dr. David Hoel, recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on the health effects of radiation, served on the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) panel of experts which in 2009 classified ultraviolet radiation (UVR) as a carcinogen. Member of the National Academy of Medicine. Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. 

Dr. Michael Holick, biochemist, endocrinologist and the world’s leading expert on vitamin D.  Dr. Holick was on the research team that first discovered the active form of vitamin D in 1969. Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Ramune Jacobsen, one of the world’s leading epidemiologists on sun exposure and type 1 diabetes. Parker Institute, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Dr. Pelle Lindqvist, author of one of the two leading studies on all-cause mortality, finding that avoidance of sun exposure is a risk factor for death of a similar magnitude as smoking. Karolinska Institute, Solna, Sweden.

Dr. David Llewellyn, the world’s leading epidemiologist on sun exposure and Alzheimer’s disease. University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, England. 

Dr. Robyn Lucas, one of the world’s leading epidemiologists on sun exposure and cataracts, multiple sclerosis, and the need for balance between too much and too little sun exposure. National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.

Dr. John J. McGrath, psychiatric epidemiologist and the world’s leading scientist on vitamin D/sun exposure of expectant mothers and risk of autism and schizophrenia in offspring. Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. 

Dr. Ian Morgan, the world’s leading biological epidemiologist on sun exposure and myopia (short-sightedness). Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. 

Dr. Kassandra Munger, co-author with Dr. Alberto Ascherio of the leading studies on sun exposure and multiple sclerosis. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Rachel Neale, one of the world’s leading epidemiologists on solar radiation and skin cancer and author of studies showing that vitamin D supplements do not ward off flu or colds but high levels of serum 25(OH)D dramatically are associated with reduced incidence and severity of colds and flu. QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Australia.

Dr. Henning Tiemeier, co-author with Dr. John J. McGrath of the leading study on sun exposure of expectant mothers and risk of autism in offspring. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Dr. Han van der Rhee, dermatologist and pioneer in discovering benefits of non-burning sun exposure and importance of avoiding sunburns. Haga Hospital, The Hague, The Netherlands

Dr. Antony Young, experimental photobiologist and one of the world’s leading experts on sun exposure, skin cancer and sunscreens. St. John’s Institute of Dermatology, King’s College, London, England. 

Dr. Ann Webb, one of the world's leading scientists on atmospheric radiation and the production of serum 25(OH)D in humans by sunlight.  The University of Manchester, Manchester, England.

Dr. Richard Weller, together with Dr. Martin Feelisch, a pioneer in discovering how nitric oxide is produced in the body by sun exposure and the favorable health effects of nitric oxide.  Edinburgh Medical School, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Sunshine Should Be Pursued In Moderation.

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America's second largest public health problem is insufficient sun exposure. It's responsible for 340,000 preventable deaths per year, just behind tobacco and ahead of obesity.

 

The public needs to be aware of insufficient sun exposure risks and increase daily sun exposure to improve health.

Stop fearing the sun.

Embrace sunshine.

Let's build healthier communities.